On the Cusp of the Promised Land

Twelve leaders of the people went in to spy out the land before going in to take it.

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Ten of those leaders said “no,” it can’t be done. There’s giants there. The enemy is too big. It’s too much work. It’s more comfortable here. It’ll cost too much. Take too much sacrifice.

Two of the leaders said “yes.” God has promised to be with us and to give it to us.

The people listened to the ten, and as a result they all remained in the desert, wandering, for 40 years.

This is the story we read in Numbers 13-14. For leaders of the church – pastors, elders, board members, deacons – this is a serious story. Because we have that decision to make too: to say “yes” to what God is doing and wants to do, or to say “no.” The naysayers’ arguments will always be logical, practical, and appeal to our sense of security. Change is hard work. Change is unknown.

But the stakes are high. The cost of listening to the naysayers is remaining in the desert. With the Promised Land within reach. And more than that, with the Promised Land given and, well, promised, by God. Along with His promise to never leave us or forsake us (Is. 41:10). Along with Jesus’ promise that in fact, we would do greater works than He did while on earth, with faith and obedience (John 14:12).

Saying “yes” doesn’t mean it will be easy, of course. We still have to fight. We still have to work. It will require change and sacrifice – not just as a church or a leadership team, but as individuals too.

But saying yes will be worth it.

Saying yes is how we will see our churches on fire for Jesus, passionately living for Him. Passionately telling others about Him.

The question before each of us is: how will you answer?

 

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